DairyPilot FlavoVital® – with heatstress

The temperatures in early summer and heat periods show impact on dairy cows. Unlike humas, however, cows would avoid summer. At temperatures above 20°C and high humidity, high performance cows in particular suffer from heat stress. Ketosis and rumen acidosis are frequent consequences here and thus performance, animal health and fertility are also influenced.

What is DairyPilotFlavoVital®?

DairyPilotFlavoVital® is a tasty complementary feedstuff for dairy cows containing polyphenol components of selected fruits and herbs (FlavoVital), B-vitamins and live yeast.
DairyPilotFlavoVital® is an important tool to maintain high performance and animal health. DairyPilotFlavoVital® is a specialty feed for a healthy rumen as well as high metabolic efficiency.

What is FlavoVital®?

FlavoVital® – these are selected fruits and herbs processed in an unique active agent package to:

  • strengthen the body defense against inflammatory processes and oxidative stress
  • stabilize the metabolism
  • increase the metabolic efficiency

How does DairyPilot distinguish itself from other products?

DairyPilot contains …

  • FlavoVital®
    These are cell-protecting plant ingredients from selected fruits and herbs. They reduce cell stress, relieve strain on the metabolism and strengthen the defence systems in case of inflammatory processes.
  • B vitamins
    These support the rumen microbes and thus the animals’ metabolic processes.
  • Living yeasts
    These stabilise the rumen environment, permit the microbes to work better and increase the feed conversion.

What are the advantages for my herd with DairyPilotFlavoVital®?

  • high body defense strength against inflammatory processes and cell stress
  • stable metabolism and high metabolic efficiency
  • efficient rumen and stable pH value
  • higher feed intake and improved energy utilisation

Does DairyPilot also help in case of ketosis problems?

Yes, DairyPilot assists in case of ketosis problems.

The transition phase and a significant portion of the lactation cycle remains a challenge for animal nutrition. Time and again it is the balancing act between mastering the negative energy balance and an adequate effective fibre supply. This is particularly difficult due to reduced feed intake shortly before and after birth. Therefore, subclinical acidosis and ketosis are on the agenda for many dairy farms.

DairyPilotFlavoVital® stabilises the metabolic processes, increases the metabolic efficiency and can thus reduce the frequency of ketosis.Do you have ketosis problems and don’t know what to do? Contact us here.

As an agriculturalist, which advantages do I have through the use of DairyPilotFlavoVital®?

  • a robust and resilient herd
  • increased milk yield and fattening performance
  • better animal welfare
  • significantly more calmness and composure in the barn
  • higher profits

How and when do I use DairyPilotFlavoVital®?

  • general application
    • for birth preparation
    • in lactation
    • for rearing calves
    • for fattening cattle
  • for concentrate feed based rations
  • for improved feed conversion
  • to safeguard high performances
  • for digestion and metabolism disorders
  • during high stress situations (i.e. heat, transition phase, etc.)

How is DairyPilotFlavoVital® fed?

For use during high-lactation at 100 – 150 g per animal per day and in the dry period at 60 g per animal per day. During high stress loads, such as acidosis, ketosis, metabolic stress, digestive disorders, claw and udder problems, we recommend up to 200 g per animal per day.
The application recommendations vary for breeding calves and bulls.

Which experiences have agriculturalists gathered with DairyPilot?

Many agriculturalists already successfully use DairyPilot. Find out what they have to say about it here.

According to Ms Engel, a certain calm and continuity has been determined in her herd since the application of DairyPilot.

Why animal health?

A healthy cow is not only reported in milk production, it is essential for economic milk production success. In times of volatile markets and a critical debate about animal welfare with the public, the aspect of animal health is of particular significance.
The transition phase and a significant portion of the lactation cycle remains a challenge for animal nutrition. Time and again it is the balancing act between mastering the negative energy balance and an adequate effective fibre supply. This is particularly difficult due to reduced feed intake shortly before and after birth. Therefore, subclinical acidosis and ketosis are on the agenda for many dairy farms. Unfavourable conditions in the later lactation phase (heat stress, group changes, ration reformulation, inadequate feed quality) can also lead to poor productivity.
In addition to the above mentioned factors, there are still a number of broader variables that have an impact on animal health and performance. These range from pathogens, such as viruses, bacteria and fungi to stall design reasons, the cause may be physical, such as lesions. Larger herds often make it difficult for individual animal feeding. In addition, animal monitoring is more difficult. It is exactly these challenges the farmer has to face to reach a high life productivity of the herd. The farmer is therefore over the whole lactation cycle asking for an inconspicuous and reliably manageable cow with prolonged lifetime production.

Healthy cows mean better animal welfare and for the farmer less workload and emotional stress.

Which stresses are located in my animals’ environment?

Feeding and inevitable conflicts in rations and herd management, burdens by pathogens, lack of hygiene in the stable and during calving, deficits in farm management, as well as mechanical stress caused by the daily milking process provide possible low level pressure factors for animal health and are a source of infections. Thus, fostering high metabolisms under sub-optimal conditions can lead to the formation of free radicals and oxidative stress. The resulting inflammatory processes are often clearly visible (see clinical signs of inflammation). They also run in the background subclinically and thus affect the performance and weaken the health of the animals. This „background noise“ is omnipresent in the animal and cannot be prevented, but can be reduced.

Video: The so-called “background noise” in the animal can be vividly compared with an internal storm.

Clinical signs of inflammation

  • Mastitis (udder)
  • Uterine metritis
  • Laminitis
  • Skin lesions, Cellulitis
  • Acidosis (inflammation of the rumen and intestinal mucosa)
  • Diarrhoea

Inflammatory processes and subliminal background noise hinder performance

  • The body‘s immune system is constantly on high alert,
  • responding to false triggers and low level stimuli
  • This process uses energy
  • Animals feel sick
  • Loss of appetite
  • Performance is reduced

Figure 1: The background noise is omnipresent and infl uences performance and welfare.

JOSERA graphic shows the effects of the background noise

Inflammatory processes, independent of their relevance, are always energy-consuming. This begins in the digestive tract, where the body already fends off pathogens. Thus each small, often irrelevant inflammation triggers a full immune response.Inflammatory processes, independent of their relevance, are always energy-consuming. This begins in the digestive tract, where the body already fends off pathogens. Thus each small, often irrelevant inflammation triggers a full immune response. Due to the large number of small, irrelevant causes, unnecessarily triggering the complete inflammatory cascade, a lot of energy is lost. This not only impairs performance, but also the defense against an actual inflammation.

Inflammation is the response of the body to injury. This can be of a different nature:

  • physical (injuries, foreign bodies, solar radiation, heat, cold)
  • chemical (acids, alkalis, toxins)
  • biological (viruses, bacteria, fungi)

The aim of the inflammation is to remove the harmful stimulus, to eliminate the spread of the injury as well as to re-establish tissue function.

Video: The “background noise” in the body is reduced and the animal can concentrate again on the essential processes.

Scientific explanations

In new scientific studies, it has been shown that dietary factors influence gene expression (Nutrigenomic). The most famous example in animal nutrition is the metabolic programming of the calf. Here, optimal feeding in the first three weeks has a significant influence on subsequent performance. Secondary plant metabolites (polyphenols) act in a similar way on gene expression, since they can affect the inflammation process and cell stress, thus saving resources. This is especially important for negative energy balance and in extreme situations (birth, heat, high performance, group changes, high pathogen pressure, etc.). In contrast to metabolic programming, this effect is not permanent, but linked to a feeding period.

This was impressively proven by Prof. Eder‘s research group (Gessner et al. 2015, submitted):
The targeted administration of plants containing polyphenols to dairy cows led to performance increases of 3.5 kg milk/d and all genes involved in inflammation were less pronounced. This speaks for a reduced inflammation response. Furthermore, expression of an indicator gene of fatty liver was considerably reduced. Polyphenols positively affected the performance of dairy cows and animal health (table 1 and 2). (adapted from Gessner et al. 2015)

Calving to 2 weeks postpartum
VariableUnitControlP-

group

p-value
DM intakekg/d16.617.20.515
Milk yieldkg/d35.439.00.029
Energy corrected

milk yield

kg/d33.937.00.045
Fat content%4.033.920.329
Protein content%3.203.220.871
Lactose content%4.804.830.470
Fat yieldkg/d1.371.470.142
Protein yieldkg/d1.091.210.028

Table 1: The influence of polyphenol containing parts of plants on the performance of dairy cows

 Control Polyphenolgroup*
CRP10.77
HP10.46
TNF10.69
ATF310.77
UGT1A110.52
FGF2110.38
*Polyphenol value relative to control group

Table 2: The influence of polyphenol containing parts of plants on inflammation and cell stress genes.

Which studies have been conducted on the DairyPilotFlavoVital®?

Over many years development process, JOSERA has produced its own polyphenol combination. It is called FlavoVital and uses the synergistic effect of selected polyphenol containing fruits and herbs.
FlavoVital was intensively tested in broad field trials with over 6,000 cows in different countries (see table 3). All test farms already fed Pansen-Pilot before the experiment or during the previous year. After a six-month trial period, a comparison was made between the previous period and the same period of the previous year.

JOSERA FlavoVital

Despite the inclusion of Pansen-Pilot in the ration during the control phase, a significant higher performance could be achieved with DairyPilot (see figure 1).

 Minimum
Maximum Average
Milk herd size801,175299
Milk amount, kg/year7,48512,8889,551
Fat, %3,644,424,03
Protein, %3,273,583,42

Table 3: Summary of the experimental farms

JOSERA graphic shows higher milk yield after using DairyPilot

Figure 2: Significant higher milk yields with DairyPilotFlavoVital® in comparison to Pansen-Pilot

DairyPilot has a significant positive impact on animal health in relation to somatic cell count (see table 4) and metabolic health (see table 5).

General dataUnit
6/2014 5/2015
Cows in milkCow199202
Lactation stageDay178176
Daily performanceKg/cow/day42,343,9
Udder healthUnit 6/2014 5/2015
Somatic cell count1,000 cells/ml16690
Infected cows%19.68.9
Infected cows at first check%21.40
Cows with chronic infection%10.66.4
Infection rate new lactation%9.42.7
Infection rate dry period%11.13.8
Uninfected rate post dry period %77.8100

Table 4: Improved udder health was observed in comparison with the previous year (LKV-data, farm Cerini, Latvia)

 Control DairyPilotFlavoVital®
Cows with ketosis
(fat / protein ratio > 1.5)
548447*
Total cows3,9684,068
*p < 0.05

Table 5: Impact of DairyPilotFlavoVital® on metabolic disorders1
1 results to 07/2015

The farmers participating in the trial also reported:

  • significantly better constitution of the animals
  • higher resistance to stress in extreme situations (heat, poor quality feed, transition phase)
  • lower veterinary costs

Areas of application for DairyPilot FlavoVital® ?

Due to the high requirements placed on our high-yield cows, flu illnesses can frequently lead to severe yield losses. Combatting the flu and allowing the cows to recover frequently uses up a large proportion of their already-scanty energy, which is why the avoidance of flu diseases has to be a top priority. The strengthening of the immune system should therefore be a matter of concern for all dairy cow owners. In addition to an optimised and stress-free husbandry system, DairyPilot, with its well-know effect, can be applied for just this purpose. DairyPilot reduces cell stress and thus supports the immune system.

Due to the high requirements placed on our high-yield cows, flu illnesses can frequently lead to severe yield losses. Combatting the flu and allowing the cows to recover frequently uses up a large proportion of their already-scanty energy, which is why the avoidance of flu diseases has to be a top priority. The strengthening of the immune system should therefore be a matter of concern for all dairy cow owners. In addition to an optimised and stress-free husbandry system, DairyPilot, with its well-know effect, can be applied for just this purpose. DairyPilot reduces cell stress and thus supports the immune system.

The temperatures in early summer and heat periods show impact on dairy cows. Unlike humas, however, cows would avoid summer. At temperatures above 20°C and high humidity, high performance cows in particular suffer from heat stress. Ketosis and rumen acidosis are frequent consequences here and thus performance, animal health and fertility are also influenced.

Limited basic feed quantities and strongly fluctuating qualities may make it necessary to check the supply of minerals and active ingredients. Maize-based rations, due to a lack of grass silage, have a significantly lower ß-carotene content than grass-based rations. Since an optimal ß-carotene supply is essential for fertility, bottlenecks can occur here especially in times of reduced feed intake (transit phase). Follicles have a memory, which means that fertility problems persist for several weeks after a shortage and the fertilised egg has a lower chance of survival. The same applies to grass silage with a dry matter content of more than 45%. In these cases, a ß-carotene supplement is recommended until the next pregnancy. It is important to optimise the utilisation of nutrients. In addition to an optimised ration, the use of DairyPilot is recommended for more efficient nutrient digestion in the rumen.


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